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Eight different home recording studio connection schemes show how to configure analog and digital multitrack recorders, audio mixers, computers, music synthesizers, drum machines, samplers, microphones, preamps and more.
 
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Studio Setup
 
  Scheme 1
 
  Scheme 2
 
  Scheme 3
 
  Scheme 4
 
  Scheme 5
 
  Scheme 6
 
  Scheme 7
 
  Analog Mixer
 
Eight different home recording studio connection schemes show how to configure analog and digital multitrack recorders, audio mixers, computers, music synthesizers, drum machines, samplers, microphones, preamps and more.


Studio Setup, page 5...
 
You may also download a PDF version of this article.

Connection Scheme 5:

In Figure 5 below, we add a MIDI expander module. A MIDI expander module is basically the same as the electrical circuits of a MIDI keyboard but without the keyboard. The main function of the MIDI expander module is to provide additional sequencer-controlled voices/instruments for the song. The expander modules usually cost less than their keyboard cousins, plus they can be mounted in a rack. The main advantage of adding expander modules to a sequenced MIDI set up is that more voices go to tape in the first generation, rather than adding noise with the additional tape bounces and overdubs described previously.
 
Figure 5 - Multi-track recording with a mixer, drum machine, MIDI sequencer, and MIDI Expander Modules.
 
I have shown the MIDI connections from the sequencer MIDI Out to the synthesizer, expander module and drum machine as a series of daisy-chained connections using the various MIDI Thru ports. This approach will work. A better approach that avoids accumulating lag times is to use a 1-In/4-Out MIDI Multiplexer box. These cheap little MIDI processors can take 1 MIDI input signal and replicate it into 4 separate MIDI outputs.

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