Sound Recording Advice for the Home Recording Studio Sound Recording Advice for the Home Recording Studio Sound Recording Advice for the Home Recording Studio Contact John Volanski via e-mail at: soundadvice@johnvolanski.com
 
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Eight different home recording studio connection schemes show how to configure analog and digital multitrack recorders, audio mixers, computers, music synthesizers, drum machines, samplers, microphones, preamps and more.
 
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Studio Setup
 
  Scheme 1
 
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  Scheme 4
 
  Scheme 5
 
  Scheme 6
 
  Scheme 7
 
  Analog Mixer
 
Eight different home recording studio connection schemes show how to configure analog and digital multitrack recorders, audio mixers, computers, music synthesizers, drum machines, samplers, microphones, preamps and more.


Studio Setup, page 7...
 
You may also download a PDF version of this article.

Connection Scheme 7:

In Figure 7 below, we have upgraded the home studio system substantially. The standalone sequencer has been replaced with a computer hosting a software MIDI sequencer application and a software recording application (sometimes these are combined into one application). The 4-channel recorder has been replaced with a standalone multitrack digital recorder. The 2-channel recorder has been replaced with a CD-R or CD-RW digital recorder. This is a completely digital recording system for the home.
 
The computer offers a flexible and powerful platform to host various audio applications such as sequencing and digital recording. A suitable hardware interface will need to be installed in the computer to allow audio and MIDI signal I/O. The MIDI Translator may be contained within the computer hardware interface box or it may need to be a standalone box connecting to one of the computer's serial ports. See book pages 39 through 43 and 78 through 82 for information on selecting computer hardware and software for your home recording studio.
 
Figure 7 - Digital Recording System with Computer and Digital Recorder
 
Virtual MIDI instruments can be recorded to the MIDI sequencer in the computer. Actual analog audio instruments and voices can be recorded either to the digital recorder software in the computer or to the standalone digital multitrack. I configured the system this way to show you how to connect a standalone digital multitrack to a computer in case your computer doesn't have enough horsepower to support a digital audio recording application. (The book discusses the minimum computer system hardware you will need to support a digital audio recording application.) MTC from the computer sequencer application is used to synchronize the tracks on the standalone digital recorder. Not shown in the diagram are the digital/analog and analog/digital converters for the standalone digital recorder. Sometimes these are included within the standalone digital recorder and sometimes you have to purchase them separately. It all depends on the model of recorder you buy.
 
The system can work in the reverse also, if you change the MIDI cables around between the standalone digital recorder and the computer. That is, the standalone digital recorder can be used as the system master and the computer can be configured to act as a slave to that master. In this case, the digital recorder will generate the master MIDI Time Code, that MTC will be sent to the computer, and the computer will synchronize itself to that master time code. Make sure you setup the computer to receive the MTC (the MTC from the standalone digital recorder must be present at the input of the MIDI Translator) and act as a slave, or you will be wondering why nothing is happening on the computer side while the master digital recorder is playing or recording.
 
This system has the capability to turn out professional quality digital recordings to CD-R or CD-RW.

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